Posted by: thebylog | September 7, 2004

Joys of Marshall

I’m e-mailing people in the U.K. Sort of odd, to be conversing out of the blue with someone on another continent, who is I’m sure a very distinguished scholar.

I’m asking them about their graduate programs in Statistics. So far I e-mailed someone from University College of London. I’m working on someone from Cambridge.

I’m wondering if they’ll write me back.

“Personal Details” and “Education” are the first two tabs in the Marshall Scholarship application process, and they are no sweat. It’s the next one “Proposed Programme of Study” that’s hanging me up. I’m sifting through British Universities. So far, possibilities include the afore-mentioned institutions and the U of York.

“Employment” is confusing. I’m not sure if they want me to list what I’ve done or not.

Ok, so I’ve skipped over the “Recommenders” tab, because I have issues with that. One of my prof’s is gone, another I’m not sure whether to ask, and the one I know I’ll ask I shot an e-mail asking if he would write and asking his opinion on the one I’m not sure whether to ask. There’s a spot for one more, and again I’m not sure who I’ll ask.

“Personal Information”, i.e. “Brag Upon Yourself”. I did. “Other Awards” is pretty easy in my case, though I actually do have something to fill out in the “grants, prizes, and medals won” box, though not much.

My biggest issue, then becomes the “Statements” tab. Here you paste in your essay and also your “Proposed Academic Programme”. The last one especially scares me. I’d like to do some research, but if I want to “read for a research degree” I’m supposed to “give an outline proposal of the research” I want to do. !!!

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Responses

  1. I noticed you put your punctuation outside your quotation marks.

    Tom

  2. I’ve always wondered what the rule for that is. You put punctuation inside the quotations in dialogue but what about other usages? Who knows?

  3. The reason I brought it up is because it brought back fond memories of a big go-round the quartet had about that. Maybe it was for the liner notes of Purpose or something. Anyway, we had a good time arguing that one out.

    I personally believe punctuation should always be inside the quotes.

    Thank you.

    Tom

  4. Hey, I pride myself on thinking I know the rule about this. Maybe I do, and maybe I don’t, but here’s my strong opinion: Punctuation always goes inside except for question marks that are part of the larger sentence and not part of the quote. i.e. Where were you when you first heard “Purpose”?

    Crystal

  5. That is the most logical, but I think technically I’m right. Why don’t somebody look it up officially?

    Answer: In the studio.

    Tom

  6. i think Crystal’s right, tom.
    by, are you going to England? or am i missing something here??? pardon me if i seem DENSE, but i’m still absorbing this… i have to be dense.
    Q

  7. i think Crystal’s right, tom.
    by, are you going to England? or am i missing something here??? pardon me if i seem DENSE, but i’m still absorbing this… i have to be dense.
    Q

  8. I’m almost positive Crystal’s right. Lauri

  9. I’m almost positive Crystal’s right. Lauri

  10. You’re missing something q, since I’m just applying for the scholarship. The odds are staggering that I’d actually pull the award in.

  11. You’re missing something q, since I’m just applying for the scholarship. The odds are staggering that I’d actually pull the award in.

  12. Sorry people, I believe am right on this one.

    Nobody has looked it up officially, you’re just stating what you would like to be true! As I said, I too think Crystal’s position is the most logical, it makes the most sense. But I think I have it officially correct.

    Thank you,

    Tom

  13. Sorry people, I believe am right on this one.

    Nobody has looked it up officially, you’re just stating what you would like to be true! As I said, I too think Crystal’s position is the most logical, it makes the most sense. But I think I have it officially correct.

    Thank you,

    Tom

  14. Okay, Tom and all, I LOOKED IT UP!! Here’s what I found. And yeah, it’s just…..right. Brain it for future reference.

    Crystal

    *Put colons and semicolons outside closing quotation marks.

    Williams described the experiment as “a definitive step forward”; other scientists disagreed.

    Benedetto emphasizes three elements of what she calls her “Olympic journey”: family support, personal commitment, and great coaching.

    *Put a dash, question mark, or exclamation point within closing quotation marks when the punctuation applies to the quotation itself and outside when it applies to the whole sentence.

    Philip asked, “Do you need this book?”

    Does Dr. Lim always say to her students, “You must work harder”?

    Sharon shouted enthusiastically, “We won! We won!”

    I can’t believe you actually like that song, “If You Wanna Be My Lover”!

  15. Tom, say something! It’s so quiet here. (Or are you busy paging/clicking through English handbooks?)

    Crystal

  16. No, I think I left my handbook in OR. I’m without ammo.

    By-log is kind of quiet lately isn’t it. Probably because By is posting too much deep stuff!

    Tom

  17. Well, it’s his blog after all, thank you very much!

    And Ag’s not doing her thing either, which means she’s probably getting fodder for y’all’s next episode. 🙂

    Merry

  18. Well, it’s his blog after all, thank you very much!

    And Ag’s not doing her thing either, which means she’s probably getting fodder for y’all’s next episode. 🙂

    Merry


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